Root canal treatment

Your tooth and surrounding gum tissue will be sore for a few days after root canal treatment and soreness can continue for up to one week. Your tooth may feel differently during the second and third weeks after treatment, but by the fourth week, it should feel like your other teeth. Please avoid chewing food on the treated side of your mouth until your endodontic therapy is complete and your tooth is covered with a protective restoration, such as a filling or crown. Please be especially careful when chewing in cases where there is a temporary filling and/or while the area is still numb.

Discomfort may be alleviated with ibuprofen (Advil or Motrin) taken up to 600mg every 4-6 hours. Acetaminophen (Tylenol) can also be used as directed as an alternative for those unable to take ibuprofen. If any other medications—such as antibiotics—have been prescribed, please take them as directed.

Should you experience discomfort that cannot be controlled with the above listed medications or should swelling develop, please contact our office immediately for special instructions that may include further medications and/or an additional visit to our office.

If treatment is not yet complete, please make an appointment for continuation of treatment within our recommended timeframe. If treatment is complete, please contact your general dentist at your earliest convenience to schedule the definitive restoration and/or continuation of comprehensive care. A letter and copy of your final x-rays will be sent to your general dentist.

We are always available for additional questions and concerns. Please do not hesitate to call our office at any time. Our voicemail is checked regularly after hours and on the weekend for emergencies.

Root-end surgery
There will be some discomfort, swelling and discoloration around the jaw and face for three-to-five days. You will also notice some bleeding/oozing from the surgical site. This is a normal part of the healing process. Applying an ice pack to the face over the surgical site for four-to-six hours after surgery will help minimize swelling and discoloration.

Discomfort may be alleviated with ibuprofen (Advil or Motrin) taken up to 600mg every 4-6 hours. Acetaminophen (Tylenol) can also be used as directed as an alternative for those unable to take ibuprofen. If any other medications—such as antibiotics—have been prescribed, please take them as directed.

Should you experience discomfort that cannot be controlled with the above listed medications or should significant swelling or bleeding develop, please contact our office immediately for special instructions that may include further medications and/or an additional visit to our office.

During the first day after treatment, limit your diet to soft foods such as scrambled eggs, soup, yogurt, and smoothies. Avoid foods that may traumatize the incision site or break down into fine, participate pieces such as nuts. These can get caught beneath the gum tissue and interfere with healing.

Continue your normal home care but avoid brushing and flossing the surgical site for four days. After four days, brush the area gently with an extra soft toothbrush. Keep the area clean with gentle salt water rinses twice daily. Use ½ teaspoon of salt for a cup of warm water.

Although you may be curious, do not pull your lips or cheeks to inspect the surgical site. This could manipulate the placement of the delicate tissue and can tear the sutures.

The sutures are dissolvable and will become loose after three-to-four days. We typically will want to see you for a 1-week post-operative visit to check on the healing of the tissue and to remove any remaining sutures.

We are always available for additional questions and concerns. Please do not hesitate to call our office at any time. Our voicemail is checked regularly after hours and on the weekend for emergencies.